The Howling Fantods

David Foster Wallace News and Resources Since March 97

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People Lie About Reading Infinite Jest?

Imagine trying to maintain a lie about reading Infinite Jest!

[...]
Most authors made their career choice early — the average age was 16, with only one respondent deciding to be a writer after 50. And there were many books assigned in school that caught their imagination, including "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "Catch-22." In terms of the canon, 81% of respondents claimed they'd read "Pride and Prejudice" and 73% "Moby-Dick" — but only 29% had taken on David Foster Wallace's "Infinite Jest." (However, 40% admitted that they'd lied about reading "Infinite Jest." Even authors experience peer pressure.)
[...]

Read more Via And the L.A. Times Festival of Books writers' survey says ... from the Los Angeles Times

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Eisenberg Responds

 

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Wallace Publications 2014 - May Update

Here's what the rest of 2014 has in store for Wallace related publications:

May 20 - David Foster Wallace: In His Own Words . Audio CD.

June 19 - Gesturing Toward Reality: David Foster Wallace and Philosophy - Edited by Robert K. Bolger and Scott Korb.

June 24 - On Tennis: Five Essays. Electronic book and Audiobook.

July 17 - David Foster Wallace and "The Long Thing": New Essays on the Novels -  Edited by Marshall Boswell.

November 11 - The David Foster Wallace Reader. (Amazon) Hardcover book, Electronic book, Audiobook.

 

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Last Updated on Thursday, 08 May 2014 11:58
 

Editing Consider The Lobster

Via New Books In Food:

Ruth Reichl joins Allen Salkin for a conversation partly about her new novel Delicious! (Random House, 2014), but also about New York City hot dogs, her writing process and the arguments she had with David Foster Wallace when editing his piece “Consider the Lobster” for Gourmet magazine.

Listen to (or download) the interview here.

 

[Thanks, Allen!]

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Last Updated on Thursday, 08 May 2014 11:31
 

Fighting the TED Talks-ization of Commencement Speeches

Via Salon from Luke Epplin, Congratulations, by the way: David Foster Wallace, George Saunders and fighting the TED Talks-ization of commencement speeches - Commencement addresses are TED Talks, all humblebraggy and eager to go viral. DFW and Saunders make them real again:

[...]

It’s not a coincidence that the addresses given by David Foster Wallace and George Saunders were selected for publication. Both literary authors have amassed unusually large and dedicated readerships. It’s hard to imagine that any writer of short stories other than Saunders would be asked to appear on such coveted programs as “The Late Show With David Letterman” and “The Colbert Report.” Wallace’s reputation as a tormented genius who grappled with the cacophony of our media-saturated age has only grown since his 2008 suicide. His plainspoken commencement address to the 2005 graduating class of Kenyon College was perhaps the most accessible bit of writing he produced; as a result, it’s been celebrated widely as a portal into the larger philosophical questions that animated his life and work. At the popular site Brain Pickings, Maria Popova asserted that Wallace’s address peels back “the curtain on the triumphs and tragedies of being David Foster Wallace.”

[...]

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Last Updated on Monday, 05 May 2014 13:42
 

What is Andy Fox Reading?

What is Andy Fox reading in Bill Amend's latest Foxtrot?

@billamend gives us a closer look.

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L.A. Review of Books - Good Old Wallace

Tim Peters looks deeply at Good Old Neon (from Oblivion) for the Los Angeles Review of Books suggesting allusions to Hawthorne, Hemingway, Salinger and Tolstoy as well as a reading re: the state of prose fiction today in his essay, Good Old Wallace:

[...]

Is “Good Old Neon” then a sort of vivid, pessimistic prophecy? A vision of a psyche that for some troublingly deep, fundamental, almost a priori reason is both unable and unwilling to grow up and to evolve and to participate in the world as a responsible adult? Could it be that this anxiety is also what’s hiding behind prose fiction’s societal malaise, and behind the troubles Wallace was having while he worked on The Pale King? That plain old unadorned narrative prose has just become more or less culturally impotent and exhausted and unable to extricate itself from the spiral of inauthenticity?

[...]

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Last Updated on Monday, 05 May 2014 13:19
 



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